TUL: 5746 E Apache St. Tulsa, OK 74115
FXE: 1072 NW 53rd St. Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309

MzeroA Flight Training wrapped up their series with Champion Aerospace by sharing information about Slick Magnetos. If you are interested in how magnetos work or maintenance of the magneto, the video will answer many questions you might have. QAA is the only factory authorized service center for all Slick Magnetos. We are available for any technical support you may need that is not addressed in the video. Be sure to see our selection of Slick Magnetos if you need any parts for your aircraft.

13Feb

Want more information about the maintenance of your spark plugs? Many pilots don't know the best practices for maintenance of their spark plugs. Watch the below video produced by Champion Aerospace that is full of helpful information.     Be sure to check out our spark plug selection here if you need to have your parts replaced. 

Champion Aerospace to maintain high standards in their products has released a new updated manual for Slick Magneto by Champion. L-1363G manual provides many updates to the previous manual but there are three important updates for the service of Slick Magnetos. The first update that is important to Slick users is the time before overhaul of the magnetos has changed. Previously, the Slick Magnetos TBO was the same as that of the engine but now there is a 12-year overhaul requirement. The second change has to do with the required inspection of pressurized magnetos. Slick Magnetos that are pressurized must be inspected at 250 hour now. The last change is the testing procedure of the capacitor. The manual used to only allow for the testing of the capacitor with a MIT410-EN megger. Now the manual...

A common issue that pilots run into is they have no or low output from their aircraft alternator. Often the issue is not with the alternator itself but with another component. The below video provides an effective guide to troubleshooting your alternator to verify if the issue is with the alternator or possible located in a different part.

07Sep

Turbocharger Cool Down

by Seth Black

Hartzell Engine technologies has produced a second video in their educational series highlighting their product line. The second installment is titled "The Importance of Cool Down Time for Your Aircraft's Turbocharger". The video details the effects of cutting short your cool down time. Hartzell also goes into proper procedures for cool down to prevent these effects. We highly recommend watching the below video if you are needing information about cool down times as this extends the life of your turbocharger.     The video does not fully illustrate the effects of a shortened cool down for a turbocharger. According to our experienced turbocharger technician, J.R. Hargrove, the more damaging stress of short cool down will occur in the turbine housing of the turbocharger. When the part is not allowed proper...

07Sep

Hartzell Engine Technologies has started an informational series regarding their products. The first entry in the series is a video entitled “Understanding Your Aircraft Starter’s Duty Cycle”. The video is a little over three minutes long and provides information of the duty cycle of different starters. The information provided is great and should be used by all pilots. However, if you are like me you would like to know what is happening in the starter when these guidelines are not followed. The results of overheating your starter will definitely lead to frustration and the purchase of a new starter.The first thing to know about aircraft starters or starters in general is that they are very powerful components of your ignition system. The electric motors...

Bendix Magnetos earned their notoriety and popularity due to their significant production during World War II from the Bendix factory in Sidney, NY. The growth of Bendix Magnetos and all other types of magnetos owe their success to Robert Bosch. Bosch was the first person able to adapt a magneto to an automotive engine. After this innovation in 1897, magneto use proliferated and allowed for the expansion of aviation in the 1920s and 1930s. The Scintilla Magneto Company, a Swiss company, started a manufacturing plant in Sidney, NY after World War I ended. The extensive use of magnetos in America led to Bendix Aviation Corporation purchasing Scintilla Magneto Company in 1929. The production of the Bendix Magnetos was expanded in 1935 and would continue until the end of World War...

Here at Quality Aircraft Accessories we take great pride in our work. We know that perfection is a race with a moving finish line. Fortunately for us, and you, we have a secret weapon in our pursuit. We are home to some of the most knowledgeable and skilled technicians in our industry. We know our technicians well and work with them every day; however, we want you take a peek in our shop and see what makes them tick for yourself.   Kevin Wilson has been with Quality Aircraft Accessories since its humble beginnings in 1999. Kevin has mastered many accessories before magnetos including turbo system parts, hydraulic pumps and governors. This varied background gives him a solid foundation and ultimately a better understanding of ...

Overhaul and Rebuild are terms commonly used in Aviation to refer to the condition of a part. People in the Aviation industry often use these words interchangeably; it is easy to see the parts as the same and generally the overhaul is less expensive. Often people are left asking, “why should I get a Rebuilt unit when an overhauled is the same for less?”. The two terms are different because of the type of work performed. An Overhaul means that a part is disassembled and examined, parts are replaced as necessary according to the manufacturer’s overhaul manual. To consider a part in Rebuilt condition it must be brought back to factory new specifications as per the manufacturer. Contrasting the two definitions highlights the disparity between Rebuilt and Overhauled. The differences between a Rebuilt and Overhauled...

Magneto failure is uncomfortably commonplace. Mags are full of plastic components that are less than robust; plastic is used because it’s non-conductive. Fortunately, our aircraft engines are equipped with dual magnetos for redundancy, and the probability of both magnetos failing simultaneously is extremely remote. Mag checks during preflight runup can detect gross ignition system failures, but in-flight mag checks are far better at detecting subtle or incipient failures. Digital engine monitors can reliably detect ignition system malfunctions in real time if the pilot is trained to interpret the data. Magnetos should religiously be disassembled, inspected and serviced every 500 hours; doing so drastically reduces the likelihood of an in-flight magneto failure. Written by: Mike Busch